AfterMarketNews Brake&Frontend BodyShopBusiness Counterman EngineBuilder Fleet Equipment ImportCar Motorcycle & Powersports News Servicio Automotriz Shop Owner Tire Review Tech Shop Tomorrow's Tech Underhood Service Speedville

Solving Carbon Deposits In Direct Fuel Injection Engines

Symptom: Misfire codes, stumbling and suspicious fuel trim numbers. On a scan tool, the engine may show a loss in volumetric efficiency. The driver may complain about a loss of power, poor fuel economy and hard starts. Cause: Carbon deposits on...

Read more...

Using Your Oscilloscope: Current Ramp Test Ignition Coils

Regardless of design configuration, the role of the ignition coil is to multiply battery voltage into high voltage. Following Ohm’s law for the conversion of volts to amperes, oil-filled coils generally require 3 to 5 amperes of primary current...

Read more...

Serial Data Bus Diagnostics

Understanding The Function of Serial Data Buses If serial data buses did not exist, a wiring harness would have to be five times its normal size and use twice as many sensors to deliver the same level of functionality and safety we see in the modern...

Read more...

GM Power Steering Noise/Leaks

GM: Power Steering Noise/Leaks from Power Steering Pump, Gear or High Pressure Hose During Extreme Low Temperature Conditions MODELS: -2009-2015 Buick LaCrosse (Equipped with Hydraulic Power Steering) -2010-2013 Buick Regal -2012-2015 Buick...

Read more...

Ford Edge Brake Replacement

Ford Edge Brake Replacement Basics The Ford Edge is an SUV based on the CD3 platform. The brakes on these vehicles are straightforward and do not break any new ground. There were no major changes to the brake systems from 2007 to the current model. For...

Read more...

Live-Axle Wheel Bearing Replacement

Replacing wheel bearings on a vehicle with a live rear axle may not be one of the most frequent jobs, but it can be one of the most profitable. While the basics have not changed in more than 60 years, new seal materials and differential designs have...

Read more...

The Ins And Outs Of Sanders

Sanders are required tools in today’s collision repair shop. Body techs and painters rely upon them every day to achieve that perfect finish on your customers’ vehicles. Whether you’re prepping a panel for paint or removing imperfections before...

Read more...

Are You Regularly Maintaining Your Equipment?

Technicians who are idling because the welder won’t feed wire, the hydraulic ram won’t pull chains, the booth heater won’t heat or the air compressor won’t compress enough air is a costly mistake, as labor time is the most expensive thing in any...

Read more...

Celebrate 'Back To The Future' Day By Watching The Time Machine Get A 2015 Detail

    For many today is just another Wednesday, but for a lot of people it is more than just your average Wednesday, it is "Back to the Future" Day. It is a day that everyone who watched the cult classic trilogy Back to the Future recognizes...

Read more...


Home European Tech Tip: Installing Timing Belt Covers with Guides for 2001 Hyundai Sonata,...

Print Print Email Email

Some 2001 Hyundai Sonata and Santa Fe vehicles may experience one or more of the following conditions:

– Rough running;
– Rough idle;
– Lack of power at low rpm; or
– Check engine light on (DTC P0335 crankshaft position sensor malfunction).

This may be caused by the exhaust camshaft coming out of time. A new timing belt cover (P/N 21360-38214-D) that incorporates a timing belt guide has been installed on vehicles produced since Jan. 30, 2001 (see Fig. 1).

Vehicles that experience the condition described above should be updated with the new timing belt cover following the steps in this Tech Tip. figure 1

Applicable Models: 2001 Hyundai Sonata and Santa Fe with 2.4L engine

Inspection:

1. Inspect the production date of the vehicle. Vehicles produced on or after Jan. 30, 2001, are not affected by this Tech Tip.

2. Remove the upper timing belt cover.

3. Rotate the crankshaft until the timing mark of the intake cam sprocket is aligned with the timing mark on the rocker cover.

4. Inspect the alignment of the timing mark on the exhaust cam sprocket with the timing mark on the rocker cover:
 a. If the exhaust timing mark is properly timed, skip to step 13.
 b. If the exhaust timing mark is not timed properly, continue to the Repair Procedure.

Repair Procedure:

1. Remove the right front wheel and engine splash shields.

2. Lower the vehicle and support the engine with a floor jack.

3. Remove the right-side engine mount, water pump pulley, accessory drive belts and lower timing belt cover.

4. Set the engine to top dead center (TDC) and set the intake and exhaust cam sprockets on their timing marks (as close as possible).

5. Remove the auto tensioner and timing belt.
 a. Inspect the timing belt. If it’s worn, cracked or frayed, replace it.
 b. Inspect the tensioner. If it’s leaking fluid, replace it.

6. Slowly compress the tensioner in a vise (apply pressure until resistance is felt, allow tensioner to compress, then apply more pressure) until the locking pin can be re-installed. A locking pin is supplied with a new tensioner. If an extra locking pin is not available, a 3/64” steel pin can be substituted. figure 2

7. Install the cam sprocket holder (SPX/Kent-Moore P/N 09231-38000 or equivalent) to hold the cam sprockets in alignment during timing belt installation. Install the tool 1/4” deep after the sprocket timing marks are in alignment.

Note: Insert the tool only 1/4” to make it easier to remove after the timing belt is installed.

8. Set the oil pump sprocket so that timing marks #7 and #8 are aligned. Quickly rotate the sprocket back and forth, between the 9 and 12 o’clock positions “feeling” for a “centering feel” when the timing marks meet. If the sprocket timing mark feels like it wants to move away from the other mark, rotate the sprocket one complete revolution and try it again (see Fig. 2).

9. Verify the following timing marks are aligned (see Fig. 3):
 a. Camshaft sprockets (intake 1, 2; exhaust 3, 4). figure 3
 b. Balance shaft (5, 6) and oil pump sprocket/balance shaft (7, 8).
 c. Crankshaft (9, 10).

10. Wrap the timing belt in a clockwise direction starting from the intake cam sprocket. Keep the belt tight when installing it over the exhaust cam sprocket, oil pump sprocket/balancer and crankshaft.

11. Apply hand pressure to the tensioner pulley to take up any slack, and remove the lock pin from the tensioner. Remove the cam sprocket holder (see Fig. 4).

12. Rotate the crankshaft clockwise (by hand) two complete revolutions and set to TDC. If the TDC mark was passed, then rotate the crankshaft another two complete revolutions. The crankshaft must be turned clockwise only for proper tension and orientation of the timing marks.

13. Inspect the timing marks of the cam sprockets for proper timing. Figure 4

Note: Due to the difference in ratio between the crank sprocket and the oil pump sprocket, the oil pump sprocket will appear out of time after turning the crankshaft two revolutions (provided the sprocket was set properly in steps 8 and 9). The oil pump sprocket will come into alignment on the sixth revolution (1:1.5 ratio; crank to oil pump).

14. If the timing marks are properly timed, rotate the crankshaft an additional 90° to take the marks off of TDC.

15. Reassemble the engine (if applicable) and install a new timing belt cover P/N 21360-38214-0.

16. Test-drive the vehicle to confirm that the condition has been corrected.

 

Written by Dennis Shortino, ALLDATA editor, and Jeff Webster, ALLDATA technical writer.

The following two tabs change content below.
Import Car Staff Writers

Import Car Staff Writers

Latest articles from our other sites:

Lifetime Warranties: The Woes Of Discount Parts

There are warranties, and then there are lifetime warranties. Some people won’t buy anything unless it has a substantial warranty attached to it. My dad was one of those guys. It didn’t matter what...More

Monster Unleashes Professional Technician Gloves

Monster unleashes the new Monster Mobile Original Glove (P/N MST08) for vehicle service technicians. The durable, machine washable synthetic leather palm and breathable TrekDry back-of-hand combine...More

CARS-NACE: Training You Can't Afford To Miss

If you have read anything I wrote, you have probably noticed that I am always suggesting that you get out of your shop, attend training, meet some new people and get a new perspective on what you do. I’m...More

Monster Unleashes Professional Technician Gloves

Monster unleashes the new Monster Mobile Original Glove (P/N MST08) for vehicle service technicians. The durable, machine washable synthetic leather palm and breathable TrekDry back-of-hand combine...More

Redline Detection Offers High Pressure Automotive Diagnostic Leak Detection

Every technician has replaced a turbo or other costly components only to find that it wasn't the problem. When it comes to turbo, diesel, any type of boosted engine, until now it's been impossible to...More

ATEQ Introduces VT36 TPMS Sensor Activation and Programming Tool

  This month, ATEQ is introducing the VT36 TPMS sensor activation and programming tool. The ATEQ VT36 allows service providers to: • Activate and display all sensor data in seconds: ID,...More